Updated SBG Rubric – Physics

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I am writing this post mostly as an update to this one now that I have been playing with my SBG rubric for a while. To start with, check this out:

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This is one of my “Challenge Problems”. It is a chance for students to show me evidence of their mastery of any or all of the learning targets for a unit. Notice the rubric in there? I put a check next to a target if I see solid evidence of that skill (very minor mistakes only). Then I give feedback in the blanks. So far I like the small blanks, they encourage me to keep it short and sweet. If I need to say more to a student than that, I probably need to talk to them in person anyway.

This is the final part of the rubric for the unit. To earn the previous two levels for each learning target:

Level 1: Complete some class activities. Show them to the teacher for feedback (or to level up and move on). When possible, Level 1 can also be earned through a multiple choice scenario. In either case, Level 1 is about showing some basic knowledge of the topic or skill.

Level 2: Ace a multiple choice quiz. These are short and only one topic at a time, although a student could take as many different quizzes as they want in a single sitting. There is a 12 hr wait time for re-takes. All questions are randomly generated, either from a bank of possible questions or the same questions with different numbers. Level 2 is all about applying the skill in a problem solving situation (but still in isolation).

Level 3: Demonstrate evidence of the skill in coordination with the other skills in the unit. Students know ahead of time what the Challenge Problem will look like because Level 3 is about knowing what good evidence looks like. This is why my rubric in the example above doesn’t have info for the students. Part of this task is figuring out what “Level 3” looks like for each skill. It’s not totally up to them to figure this out though. We have activities built into the unit where we explicitly talk about what Level 3 looks like for each one. Plus they can attempt the challenge problem multiple times, getting feedback each time.

Level 4: Ah, level 4, you continue to prove elusive. I’ve got a place for this level in my gradebook, but so far have not really used it. I’ve talked about using some sort of super-ultra-mega-challenge problems, or a short student directed project (my fav idea) but so far haven’t followed through :(.

Here’s an example of how my gradebook looks now:

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